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NPC

NPC Update: What Policy Themes Might Emerge?

NPC Update: What Policy Themes Might Emerge?

NPC Update: What Policy Themes Might Emerge?

NPC Update: What Policy Themes Might Emerge?

By

Basilinna

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May 15, 2020

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The annual National People’s Congress (NPC) meetings – delayed since March due to the pandemic – will begin on May 22 in Beijing. The fact that the session will be held in-person is a milestone in China’s return to normalcy. COVID-19 will dominate the agenda along with how to spur the economy, particularly getting consumer spending back on track and helping the small and medium-sized enterprises. Most closely watched will be the setting of the economic growth target – a centerpiece of this meeting in normal times. We expect to see either a move away from setting the target or a lowering to potentially 3% – from the previous 6% target.

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Quick Take: China's new financial "Dream Team" signals opening up

Quick Take: China's new financial "Dream Team" signals opening up

Quick Take: China's new financial "Dream Team" signals opening up

Quick Take: China's new financial "Dream Team" signals opening up

By

Basilinna

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March 27, 2018

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What comes next after China's financial "Dream Team" was announced? Opening up of China's financial sector to foreign firms is a priority of the newly announced leadership coming out of the National People’s Congress. The financial sector leadership announced last week is the most Westernized and technically experienced to date.

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NPC Update: Fact Sheet

NPC Update: Fact Sheet

NPC Update: Fact Sheet

NPC Update: Fact Sheet

By

Basilinna

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March 2, 2018

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Each March, the National People’s Congress (NPC) and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) convene to approve the work plans for the next year in what is commonly known as the “Two Meetings,” or Lianghui. The NPC annual meeting brings together 2,980 deputies from the provinces, the military, and the central government in Beijing. Given the significant personnel changes over the past five years, almost 75 percent of the delegates will be new.

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